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June 19, 2017

How to effectively handle emotional eating

“Eat when you’re hungry, stop when you’re full.” It sounds so simple, yet countless people struggle with putting this principle into practice. Why is overeating such a battle? One of the main reasons is because people aren’t tuned in to their bodies. They lose sensitivity to true stomach hunger, and get it confused with a multitude of other signals and needs.
What is stomach hunger?

Stomach hunger–or physical hunger–involves a complex interaction between the digestive system, endocrine system and the brain. When the body needs refueling, we start feeling tired and weak, while finding it harder to concentrate and work. The stomach, which is located just below the ribcage, starts to ache and rumble. This is true stomach hunger. When we begin eating in response, we really enjoy the food and start feeling better, because a bodily need is being met.
What happens when I ignore my stomach hunger?

If you don’t feed your body when it needs food, the physical symptoms intensify. The stomach starts to really hurt. You find it more difficult to concentrate and may experience lightheadedness. You may also get irritable and short-tempered. In addition, some people get shaky and nervous, while others get a headache. Because you are so ravenous at this point, once you do start to eat, you’re very vulnerable to uncontrolled eating or bingeing.
When I eat, how do I know when to stop?

Hunger and fullness is regulated by the hypothalamus in the brain. When your body has had enough food to satisfy its needs, signals are sent to the hypothalamus, registering fullness (also called satiety). When we are in tune to our bodies, we recognize when it’s time to stop eating. The stomach feels comfortable, and satisfied–not stuffed. We soon begin to feel calmer, more alert and energized.

It takes approximately 20 minutes for fullness signals to transmit from the stomach back to the brain. So, if you eat too fast and aren’t paying attention, it’s easy to override this system and eat more than what the body is calling for.
How do I know when I am overeating?

When you are eating at a calm, relaxed pace and paying attention to your body, you will notice the following when you have eaten more than physically needed:

-You are mechanically taking bites and swallowing, but you aren’t really enjoying the food anymore.
-You are feeling pressure and discomfort in your stomach. If filled further, it starts to hurt. You may even feel queasy.
-After a while you start to feel sluggish.

What if I can’t detect hunger and/or fullness signals in my body?

Assuming that you’re not eating too hurriedly or with many distractions, there are several possible reasons for having difficulty perceiving these internal bodily cues. If you’ve been ignoring your hunger and fullness signals for a long time, you may have temporarily lost your physical sensitivity to them. This is often the outcome of frequent dieting, chronically restricting food intake, being raised to “clean your plate,” or struggling with any kind of disordered eating. If this is the case for you, it will take some time to rediscover hunger and fullness cues, which may require professional guidance. Outside help is especially crucial if: 1) you are never hungry and routinely get full with just a few bites, or 2) you are always hungry and never feel satisfied after eating.

Sometimes, there are emotional reasons for a person being unable to access their hunger and fullness signals. Getting in touch with body sensations stirs up painful memories for some people, while others feel undeserving of meeting their own needs. If you are one of these people, it is important to work through these issues with a therapist who specializes in eating disorders.

Lastly, in some cases, there are medical explanations for problems with hunger and fullness. For instance, certain medications, specific diseases, depression, stress and pain can clearly increase or decrease the appetite. But overall, there are still many unanswered questions regarding the body’s regulation of food intake. Research is currently underway to try to better understand the complex mechanisms, and to figure out why some people struggle more than others.
What are some “false alarm” signals that are often confused with stomach hunger?

Sometimes, we mistake other signals in our bodies for physical hunger. They are legitimate sensations, but not true stomach hunger. Here are some examples:

“Teeth Hunger”

Sometimes, especially if we’re feeling irritated or stressed, we want to chew our frustrations away. Our bodies are not calling for food, but we put it in our mouths as an attempt to relieve anxiety.

“Mouth Hunger”

We see or smell something that looks so delicious that our mouths start to water. Sometimes just thinking about a food brings on a craving for it. We desire to taste the food, but really aren’t physically hungry.

“Mind Hunger”

We look at the clock and think we have to eat a certain amount of food because “it’s time”, even if we don’t feel like eating.

Thirst

Sometimes we confuse the sluggishness of dehydration with actual hunger. The body is calling for fluids, not food.

Fatigue

When we sense that our energy levels are low, some of us automatically think that if we eat something, we’ll feel better. However, if we’ve been working extra hard and/or haven’t been getting enough sleep, our bodies are calling for rest, not food.

“Heart Hunger/Emotional Hunger”

We feel an ache and emptiness in our hearts due to unmet emotional and/or spiritual needs. Rather than acknowledge our feelings and work through our issues, we try to fill the void with food. Or sometimes we try to use food to “stuff” our feelings down. Although there can be physical discomfort in the gut when we’re upset, it is a distinctly different sensation from stomach hunger.
Moving forward…

As you can see, the simple design of physical hunger and fullness is often overshadowed by other body signals, habits, needs and emotions. Identifying and dealing with them appropriately is a huge step in the process of discerning true stomach hunger. Learning to eat intuitively–meeting your body’s true physical needs for fuel and nourishment–will help you naturally reach the healthiest weight for your one-of-a-kind body.

Article source: http://www.findingbalance.com/articles/understanding-hunger-and-fullness-cues/

April 5, 2017

Get more protein in your diet

Here are some high protein foods that will not only help you feel fuller, LONGER, but may also help you win the war vs. body-fat. Protein helps the body to ‘repair and recover’ from strenuous activity, but can aid in weight loss, building lean muscle, and getting you stronger.

Almonds

Packed with vital nutrients like magnesium, Vitamin E, fiber, and manganese.

Chicken breast

This is packed with protein. You can bake, crock pot, BBQ, cook in coconut oil, etc.

Greek Yogurt

Thick and creamy, this can satisfy anyone’s sweet tooth and it is high in protein and fiber (depending on brand).

Lean cuts of beef

Packed with iron and B12, and it taste great.

Fish (salmon/tuna)

High in nutrients and Omega 3’s, a healthy fat.

Oats

Chock full of fiber, manganese, magnesium, and other nutrients. This can help you feel full for hours.

Whey protein

This is a protein source taken from dairy. The body can easily utilize it to help build muscle and may help weight loss.

Hemp protein

High in fiber, Omega 3’s, and protein. This is a great option for Vegans or those who need help getting in daily fiber.

Lentils

A great source for plant based protein. They are high in potassium, iron, folate, magnesium, and other essential nutrients.

Broccoli

Loaded with Vitamin C and K, fiber, and potassium. It may also help in warding off cancer.

Pumpkin seeds

High in nutrients like iron, zinc, and magnesium.

Ezekiel bread 

This bread is made with organic and sprouted whole grains and legumes. It is high in protein and fiber.

There you have it! Some foods that you can add to your current diet to get your protein in, build muscle, lose fat, and feel great. I bet there were some on here that never crossed your mind when you thought of moderate to high protein foods.

Which ones do you have heavy in your rotation right now? Which will you add? What are some of your favorites?

January 16, 2017

How to avoid a plateau

You start a new diet. You see some fantastic results pretty quickly. The struggle, of course, is then maintaining this weight loss. Changing eating patterns for a short period is different than sustaining them. This is the area people seem to have the most problems with. Once frustration and boredom sets in, once dieters have reached that plateau, it becomes so easy to just give up in disappointment.

Dig Down Deep

When you are in a rut, don’t give up! That’s the worst thing you can do. Boredom might be leading you back towards your old habits, but fight back! What’s vital to overcoming this sense of apathy is to set goals. Not just in the beginning of your diet, but throughout it. Goals should be specific, yet flexible. They should allow for some minor setbacks, and yet encourage you to keep moving forward.

As an example, say your goal is to lose 50 pounds. Great! But how are you going to get there? Is it by eating a specific amount of calories? Perhaps by eating enough servings of fruits and vegetables? Are you going to try to work out a few times a week? Be accommodating to yourself. Realize that you are not perfect and you might splurge on something tasty every now and again. Don’t view this as diet failure.

Be sure to set S.M.A.R.T goals. Make them Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Time Based. This will help you to have very clear, detailed goals.

Keep it Fresh

One of the biggest things that can be seen as contributing to diet boredom is a regimen that is so specific; it eliminates certain things from your diet, such as a low carbohydrate diet. These diets are not inherently bad, but it limits the variety of food options. So do your best to keep it fresh.

When struggles of tediousness come, counterattack! Change the types of food you eat. Don’t have the same dinners every week. Try new things out. It might take a little extra effort in the kitchen, but creativity in the kitchen can be fun. One way to do this is to splurge on a new healthy cookbook. Try out a new recipe once a week. Also, get your family involved in healthy cooking. Perhaps each family member can have a night of the week, not only to help cook, but to help pick out a recipe. You can also do a healthy recipe exchange with friends.

Choose variety
Above all else, a diet is nothing without combining other aspects of healthy living. Drink plenty of water, as always. This will keep you from munching throughout the day. Also, eat more fruit, veggies and protein. Be sure to find something outside of the gym that also brings you joy.
Finally, concentrate on fitness aspects as well. You won’t lose weight effectively if you do nothing to train your body. Hit the weights, start walking, and find activities that you like doing. You’ll be more inclined to stick with it if you do.
October 26, 2016

How to begin training again after a layoff

If you haven’t trained since George Bush was in office, you will want to be smart about how you approach training this go around. If you rush into things, and go too hard, too soon, you may end up injured, burned out, and back on the couch feeling defeated.

Here are some simple, no nonsense ways in which I help my clients who haven’t moved in a long time to ease back into training. This ensures that they can allow their body to adapt to the new stress, wrap their mind around the new changes, don’t injure themselves, and ensure that this becomes a lifestyle change.

It’s time to stop beating yourself up for being inactive, eating junk, abusing yourself and your body, and focus on getting started.

Born Again Fitness

Focus on making one change at a time

Research shows that you will be more successful if you focus on making one change at a time vs trying to change a million things at once. Instead of trying to eliminate all foods you like from your diet, try adding one healthy food per week to your diet. Focus on eating more veggies, fruit, and lean protein choices. Once you have mastered this you can move on to the next thing. That could be meal prep, a consistent exercise routine, etc. This way you don’t stress yourself out, and quit, if you don’t live up to those lofty expectations you used to set for yourself.

Plan to fail

Look, it is going to happen. At some point, you will binge, stress eat, or miss a work out or two. Changing behavior and creating new habits will take time. You must be kind, and patient with yourself during this time. I tell my clients all the time that, “failure is nothing more than feedback.” There is no need to shame or judge yourself when you hit a bump in the road. You just need to look at what occurred before you fell off the wagon, and see what you can do differently the next time you are in a similar situation.

Shift your focus from solely weight loss

Losing weight is an amazing thing, but it isn’t the only thing; keep that in mind. Far too many of us just focus on what the scale says to our own detriment. You may not have lost those 10 pounds you set out to lose in the first 4 weeks, but you can walk further, not get winded going up a flight of stairs, are stronger in the gym, feeling better, sleeping better, and the list goes on. The only problem is many of us focus on the weight we haven’t lost and miss sight of all the other things you have accomplished. Just be sure to not lose sight of the bigger picture. Health and wellness isn’t just about a number on the scale.

Break past your fear of the gym

I know many of you have a fear of the gym. You don’t want to stand out, look stupid because you don’t know what to do, and fear being judged. Look, I get all of that, I do, but you must most past that. You can’t allow the thoughts of what another person might think to get in the way of you achieving your goals. You need to take back that power and stop giving it to other people. If you’re unsure of what to do you can hire ME! or a trainer in your area to show you what to do. At some point, you are going to have to financially invest in yourself if you want to learn how to take care of your temple.

Take baby steps

If you haven’t trained in the last 6 months or longer, ease back into it. Don’t set these unrealistic expectations of working out 5 days a week, only to fall short. As you know, this will cause you to feel defeated, shamed, and cause you to quit. Instead, set a realistic goal of 1 training session per week. If you get in more than that, it is to be considered a bonus. Then the following week you can set a goal of 2x per week, and so on. Set yourself up for success and not failure.

Track your progress

To know if you’re making progress or not, you need to track it. I suggest you take measurements in bust, waist, thighs, arms, etc. Then in another 4 weeks you can measure again and you’ll see a reduction in inches, this will reflect fat loss. You can also take some selfies as well. As you know, a picture is worth a thousand words. It will be nice to do a side by side after 4 weeks and show how much your hard work is paying off.

Find an activity that you enjoy

Don’t follow the latest fitness fad in hopes of losing weight, especially if you hate it. You need to seek out those activities that you enjoy and can see yourself doing long term. If you hate running, don’t do it! You don’t have to kill yourself to get in shape. You just need to move your body daily, be consistent, and you’ll be successful.

Focus on creating new habits

We can’t eliminate old habits, but we can create new ones. I want you to put your energy into creating new habits vs. trying to eliminate the old ones. This could be you getting up 10 minutes earlier and doing a Bible devotion, stretching, meditation, etc. It could be taking the stairs at work over the elevator, drinking a protein shake for breakfast vs eating a doughnut. If you can begin to do this daily and remain consistent, eventually this new behavior will overrule the old, and you’ll have created a new habit.

Be patient with yourself

This journey is a marathon, not a sprint. You didn’t put the weight on in 4 weeks and you certainly won’t lose it in that short amount of time. You will be successful if you set realistic goals, seek out activities that you enjoy, get adequate rest, eat enough protein, try to eliminate unnecessary stress from your life, and are consistent. Keep in mind that the lessons you need to learn about yourself can only be found on this journey. Don’t be in a hurry to rush the process.

July 28, 2016

10 Successful Habits For Long Term Weight Loss

Here are some things that many people have done to not only lose weight, but keep it off long term. I have found not only with myself, but with the clients I coach, that your weight loss plan is as unique as you are. I do feel that some of these habits should be in everyone’s plan as I have seen them work for almost all of my clients.

Keep in mind that for anything to work you must be consistent and take action every single day.

I have compiled data from all of my clients over the years and put it into a blog post for you: 10 Successful Habits For Long Term Weight Loss.

1.They Eat Breakfast

Not only does eating a healthy breakfast fuel your body for the day, it can help to ward off those evening binges when you get home. Most people who skip breakfast usually end up eating more later in the day because of it. They are ravenous by the time they get home and find themselves eating everything in sight.

2. Eat According To Your Goals

In order to decrease body fat you must be in a caloric deficit. Many people set out with good intentions on their fitness journey but neglect this point. You must eat according to your goals. You can eat as ‘clean’ as you want, but if you’re still consuming too much food, you will gain weight. You can use an online calorie calculator to determine how much you should be eating for your specific fitness goal. Keep in mind those numbers aren’t set in stone and you may need to make some adjustments to them.

3. They Set Realistic Goals

My goal is to lose 50 pounds in a month! Those who set out with this type of thinking usually end up quitting. Why? because their goals are not realistic. You didn’t gain that much weight in a month, so don’t expect to lose it in a month. Use the S.M.A.R.T. method when goal setting. Make sure it is specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time bound. An example would be: I want to lose 10 pounds by working out 5 days per week, and eating fast food only once per month as a treat. I will also focus on eating more fruits/veggies and lean protein sources. I will weigh myself once a week and measure myself every two weeks. I will accomplish this goal within 60 days of starting. This is very realistic and something most people could accomplish.

4. They Celebrate Small Wins

Weight loss isn’t a linear process, you will have ups and downs on this journey. The most important thing to remember is to celebrate every ‘small win’ that you have. If you went for a walk after dinner when you would normally sit down to watch T.V., that is a small win. If you had an apple vs. a hunk of cake for dessert, again, a small win. It’s recognizing these little victories that will help to keep you going over time. It’s easy to get discouraged and feel as if you’re not making any progress, but celebrating these small wins will remind you that you are in fact changing.

5. They Don’t Moralize Food

When we moralize food, or label it as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ these will only keep us stuck on that guilt & shame cycle. When you eat food that you have labeled ‘good’ you feel great, right? but when you eat food that is ‘bad’ then you feel like crap about yourself afterwards. This only leads to further binge eating and feelings of self-loathing, shame, and guilt. Then before you know it you have given up on trying to get healthy altogether.

6. They Don’t Think in Black & White

You know what I’m talking about. It has to be this or that, there is never a middle. You either have to be perfect at your diet, exercise program, etc; or not at all. If you’re not perfect or you fail to live up to your unreasonable standards you will quit or not try at all.

Successful folks who have lost the weight realize that there is a middle ground. It is impossible to be perfect or to be on the top of your game at all times. In those moments where you slip up and make a mistake it’s okay. Don’t beat yourself up or go eat a tub of ice cream. Just look at the situation, learn what you can from it, and move on.

7. They Do Those Things They Enjoy

You need to gravitate to those physical activities that you enjoy and can see yourself doing long term. I personally think that everyone should strength train, as the benefits to the individual are incredible. Think about what it is you like to do, and then find ways to do those things. If you like to bike, hike, run, swim, etc; those are the things you should be doing. This will help you to keep the weight off long term.

8. They Incorporate Physical Activity Into Their Daily Lives

All it takes is 60 minutes of physical activity every day. That isn’t that hard if you think about it. Taking a short walk here, doing a quick weight training circuit, bike ride, walk after dinner, etc; it all adds up. Be creative and find ways in which you can incorporate more physical activity into your day.

9. They Eat More Protein

Protein is the building block of muscle, and helps to repair and rebuild. It has also been shown to improve satiety, which means you feel fuller much longer. Try to find ways to add more protein to your daily diet. I like to use whey protein shakes before and after I train, cottage cheese with fruit for a snack, hard boiled eggs, turkey, chicken, fish, etc.

10. They Have A Solid Support Group

Most successful weight loss folks have a solid support system behind them. They have at least once person they can count on to help encourage them when they feel low. It is important to remember that your success is totally up to you, but it helps to have that added encouragement from your support system.

What are some things you have done that have aided you in keeping the weight off long term? Add your ideas to the comments section below.

July 1, 2016

The ‘red flags’ of an emotionally abusive relationship

Have you ever suspected yourself of being in an  emotionally abusive relationship? Were you left feeling confused after the relationship ended? or maybe you suspect you’re in an emotionally abusive relationship now and aren’t quite sure if you can trust your gut.

Here are some easy ways to identify if you are in an emotionally abusive relationship. I urge you to not ignore these signs, or sweep them under the rug as the behavior will only get worse. I’ll also add that this can happen to both men and women. Often times, men are portrayed as the ones who are the abusers and this simply isn’t the case. Men and women can find themselves as victims of emotional abuse.

What is emotional abuse exactly? 

Emotional abuse goes much further than many think. When one thinks of emotional abuse they envision two people yelling at each other, or putting the other down. We know that emotional abuse goes beyond just words spoken to another person. Emotional abuse is designed to control, demean, subjugate, punish, and isolate the other person from friends, and family. This is done by fear of abandonment, humiliation, and other means of control

This type of abuse can range from constant criticism, incessant put downs, manipulation, and intimidation.

Do any of these look familiar?

  1. Threatening to abandon you, and the relationship if you don’t do ______.
  2. Isolating you from friends and family. Won’t allow you to make phone calls, texts, etc.
  3. They project their behavior on to you. For example if they are cheating they will accuse you of the thing they are guilty of.
  4. They deny you affection or love.
  5. They give you contemptuous looks.
  6. They often speak to you in a condescending tone.
  7. Frequent accusations and constant blame; they never take responsibility for their behavior.
  8. They blame their ex for all the issues in the past relationship. This goes back to not taking responsibility for their own behavior.
  9. They often give you the ‘silent treatment’ for days or weeks if you upset them.
  10. You are often judged and criticized unnecessarily.
  11. They trivialize or dismiss your feelings.
  12. They want to move incredibly fast. They are talking about love and marriage within the first 30 days of being together.
  13. They monopolize all of your time, and are jealous if you want to hang out with family or friends.
  14. They don’t care how their behavior makes you feel.
  15. They act as if they are superior to you, and everyone around them.

How does this type of abuse affect a person?

  1. Depression.
  2. Decreased self-esteem.
  3. Loss of interest in those things that used to bring joy.
  4. Difficulty making decisions.
  5. You no longer trust yourself, what you think, or how you feel.
  6. Hopelessness.
  7. You blame yourself for the situation.
  8. You feel ‘stuck’ and wonder if this is the best you can ever do.

Understand that emotional abuse is incredibly destructive. It slowly chips away at the person, and erodes their self-esteem. You are being brain washed by the abuser to believe all the things that they are saying about you. It isn’t until you look in the mirror one day, and don’t recognize the person looking back at you.

I will be writing part II of this blog post on what you can do if you find yourself in this situation. Be sure to subscribe to my blog to receive all the updates. If you need coaching in this area I can help.

 

June 3, 2016

Who wants to DECREASE body-fat and get in great shape?

In all honesty losing body-fat is easy but we tend to make it harder then it has to be. The #1 thing I see that trips people up is UNREALISTIC EXPECTATIONS.

You want it NOW and quit if you don’t lose 20 pounds in 4 weeks…4 weeks! you didn’t gain the weight in 4 weeks so ditch the expectation that you will lose it in 4 weeks.

Here are some very SIMPLE tips that will get you to where you want to be if you follow them.

1. Drink more water. Often times dehydration can mimic itself as hunger. Keep yourself adequately hydrated.

2. Ditch the black or white thinking. Those of you who struggle with ‘all or nothing’ thinking will find yourself starting only to quit, again and again. There is a middle here…find it! allow yourself to be human and make mistakes.

3. Eat more protein. Understand that protein is the building block of muscle and is necessary for repair and rebuilding. Protein also increases feelings of satiation, so you will feel fuller longer when you consume more protein. Some great sources are: chicken, lean beef, fish, turkey, ground meat, eggs, cottage cheese, Greek yogurt and protein powders.

4. Do NOT restrict/eliminate carbohydrates. Carbs are FUEL and are necessary in any healthy diet. The key is to eat according to your activity level that day. If you’re just lounging on the couch then you don’t need to be choking down tons of carbs, BUT if you’re active and training that day then you need to fuel your body. Some great sources are: brown rice, wild rice, sweet potatoes, whole wheat bread, wheat pasta, vegetables, fruit.

5. Fat is your friend. Yes, you heard that right. It is key in optimizing hormones for both men and women, improving metabolism and helping you feel satiated when paired with protein. Omega 3’s can also help to reduce inflammation in the body. Some great sources are: avocado, walnuts, almonds, olive oil, natural peanut butter, fish oil, krill oil.

6. Be more active. It’s pretty basic here folks. Get your butt up off the couch and go outside and frolic. We should get on average 10,000 steps per day but the average American gets only 2000-3000…no bueno.

7. Practice intuitive eating. I prefer to allow my body to tell me when to eat vs. just eating because it might be breakfast, lunch, or dinner time. We have been conditioned to eat at certain times even if we’re not hungry. Some people also believe that eating more meals per day boosts your metabolism. This simply isn’t true and the Thermic effect (TEF) is the same if you eat 3 meals at 1500 calories or 5 meals at 1500 calories. You must find what works for you.

8. R-E-L-A-X and allow the process to unfold. Stop weighing yourself every bloody day and just relax. Let the mirror and your clothes be your guide in determining body-fat reduction. Anything else and you’ll drive yourself mad, quit, and find yourself face first in a pint of Ben and Jerry’s.

9. Incorporate strength training into your exercise routine. The more muscle you have on your frame the more fat you will burn. It will also help you develop a killer physique, help negate osteoporosis and improve bone density. When you look good you feel good and this feeling of “wellness” will spill over to every area of your life.

10. Last, but most important, love yourself. Just know that you deserve to have a healthy, fully functioning body that will allow you to do those things you want to do. That may be traveling, getting pregnant, keeping up with your kids, no longer being embarrassed to wear a bathing suit, increasing intimacy with your spouse, etc.

May 6, 2016

Being Overweight or Obese Sucks

Being overweight or clinically obese SUCKS.

I don’t care what anyone else says or tries to convince themselves of.

It is unhealthy, it is mentally and physically exhausting, it erodes your self-esteem, and can rob you of a decent life.

I know firsthand because for YEARS I was obese.

I tried to convince myself that it wasn’t “that bad.”

I get a message from a gentlemen the other day who told me, “Brandon, not everyone who is overweight has some sort of psychological issue. You know that right?”

To which I responded, “duh.”

I’m well aware that not everyone has some sort of underlying issue surrounding their weight issues.

But, everyone I’ve ever worked with has had some sort of underlying issue we’ve had to address before they could successfully lose the weight and keep it off.

Mind, Body, Spirit.

You can’t address only one aspect of yourself and expect any type of major, long lasting change.

Here are just some of the things that I personally deal with to this day. I have no problem being transparent and sharing my struggles in this area.

-I’ve got to exercise often and watch my diet or I will balloon back up to Nutty Professor status.
-Losing weight and keeping it off takes WORK.
-There are days I look in the mirror and feel like dog crap; I can see that fat guy staring back at me.
-Those old tapes can start playing and if I’m not careful I’ll believe the lies they try to tell me about myself….I’m no good, not worthy, etc.

Now, these things I mentioned above are not as bad as they once were but they still creep up from time to time. I’ve had to work my ass off to overcome a lot, as have the clients I work with.

The majority of people I work with are survivors of some sort of trauma. It could have been sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical abuse, parents were drug addicts, codependents, neglectful, etc.

Often times we used food as kids to numb ourselves and this carried over into adulthood.

Maybe you had no issues like this but you find yourself struggling today with food or some other ‘thing’ that you’re using to avoid your feelings.

No matter what it is there IS healing from it. I know because I did the work and my life is completely different because of it. That doesn’t mean I don’t struggle because there are days that life kicks my butt, but I am no longer a slave to those things.

If you are struggling with your weight or some other thing that is keeping you in bondage I want you to know that I GET IT.

I know the shame you feel.

The guilt.

The feeling of being invisible.

The feeling of hopelessness.

The feeling of being unworthy.

You name the emotion, I have felt it right along with you.

Your situation isn’t hopeless, you’re not a failure, and you are not unworthy.

God didn’t put you here to just survive.

If that was the case He would have made you a tree stump.

You have a purpose in this life.

I want to help you uncover that purpose.

If my words can help just one person then it is all worth it.

If you need help with this I am available to assist you.

Your life will change the day you begin to do the hard work.

Yes, it is scary.

Yes, it will require hard work on your part.

But it is worth it and so are YOU.

If you’re ready to change your life, and live in Idaho or beyond, I can help.

April 10, 2015

Are you getting enough FAT in your diet?

Despite being vilified for many years, dietary fats are one of the 3 main nutrients that your body needs to function properly. Their numerous health benefits include controlling blood levels of cholesterol and glucose, preventing the development of cancer, reducing your heart disease risk and supporting your vital organs (including your brain, your heart, your liver and your lungs). However, due to the popularity of low fat diets and the untrue assertion that dietary fat is automatically stored as body fat, many people choose to eliminate this macronutrient from their diet. Doing this can be extremely damaging to your health and in this article I will be discussing why with 14 of the negative symptoms of dietary fat deficiency.

Read More

March 2, 2015

Decrease body-fat and improve overall conditioning

For decreasing body-fat and truly maximizing your time spent in the gym I recommend high intensity circuit training. This is a fast and efficient way to lose body-fat and elicit aerobic and metabolic effects. Research shows that the benefits of circuit training can last as long as 72 hours…far longer than doing traditional cardio for fat loss.

My clients like metabolic workouts because of the shorter rest periods which means the workout is shorter and may actually be more beneficial then someone simply going through the motions for 60 minutes. You are able to get in and out of the gym in a relatively short amount of time.

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