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April 5, 2017

Get more protein in your diet

Here are some high protein foods that will not only help you feel fuller, LONGER, but may also help you win the war vs. body-fat. Protein helps the body to ‘repair and recover’ from strenuous activity, but can aid in weight loss, building lean muscle, and getting you stronger.

Almonds

Packed with vital nutrients like magnesium, Vitamin E, fiber, and manganese.

Chicken breast

This is packed with protein. You can bake, crock pot, BBQ, cook in coconut oil, etc.

Greek Yogurt

Thick and creamy, this can satisfy anyone’s sweet tooth and it is high in protein and fiber (depending on brand).

Lean cuts of beef

Packed with iron and B12, and it taste great.

Fish (salmon/tuna)

High in nutrients and Omega 3’s, a healthy fat.

Oats

Chock full of fiber, manganese, magnesium, and other nutrients. This can help you feel full for hours.

Whey protein

This is a protein source taken from dairy. The body can easily utilize it to help build muscle and may help weight loss.

Hemp protein

High in fiber, Omega 3’s, and protein. This is a great option for Vegans or those who need help getting in daily fiber.

Lentils

A great source for plant based protein. They are high in potassium, iron, folate, magnesium, and other essential nutrients.

Broccoli

Loaded with Vitamin C and K, fiber, and potassium. It may also help in warding off cancer.

Pumpkin seeds

High in nutrients like iron, zinc, and magnesium.

Ezekiel bread 

This bread is made with organic and sprouted whole grains and legumes. It is high in protein and fiber.

There you have it! Some foods that you can add to your current diet to get your protein in, build muscle, lose fat, and feel great. I bet there were some on here that never crossed your mind when you thought of moderate to high protein foods.

Which ones do you have heavy in your rotation right now? Which will you add? What are some of your favorites?

July 10, 2016

Protein: One of the Body’s Key Building Blocks

By Dr. Donald Hayes

Protein is an important building block, comprising about 16 percent of our total body weight. Muscle, hair, skin and connective tissue consist primarily of protein, and protein plays a major role in all of the cells and most of the fluids in our bodies.

Enzymes, hormones, neurotransmitters and even our DNA are at least partially made up of protein.

Although our bodies are good at “recycling” protein, we constantly use it up, so we need to replenish it. Protein is composed of smaller units called amino acids. Our bodies can’t manufacture nine amino acids, so it’s important to include them in our diets. Animal proteins such as meat, eggs and dairy products contain all the amino acids. By combining vegetable-source proteins such as rice, beans, peas and others, a complete vegan/vegetarian option is available as well.

How Much Protein Do We Need?

Our protein requirements depend on our age, size and activity level. The typical American diet provides plenty of protein – more than the recommended daily allowance (RDA) in most instances. The RDA represents the minimum amount of protein needed to fulfill protein needs in 97.5 percent of the population. This value is equal to 0.8 g of protein per kilogram of body weight per day. Accordingly, a person weighing 150 lbs. should eat 55 grams of protein per day, a 200-pound person should eat 74 grams, a 250-pound person should eat 92 grams, and so on.

The average mixed American diet provides from one to two times the RDA for protein. You might think, based on this, that protein deficiency is unlikely in the U.S. However, the RDA for protein has been derived from research studies performed on healthy individuals. Growing children, pregnant and lactating women, the elderly, and anyone undergoing severe stress (trauma, hospitalization or surgery), disease or disability need more protein.

Protein Powders and Meal Replacement Shakes

As supplement companies improve the quality of their protein powders and more people seek convenience while trying to eat right, the thought of meal replacements making up a portion of the protein in your diet makes sense.

There are times when it’s a good idea to use a protein-powder supplement, such as first thing in the morning as part of a well-balanced diet instead of skipping breakfast or eating a high-calorie, high-fat fast food item. It’s also a good idea right after you finish a workout. The reason it’s ideal in these cases is because the protein in the shakes will be absorbed easily by your body, which is exactly what you want. Protein powders also can be beneficial for vegetarians who don’t eat any animal products. Sometimes it can be hard for vegetarians to consume enough dietary protein unless they are paying careful attention to their diet. By supplementing their diets with protein, they can make sure they don’t start losing muscle mass due to low protein intake.

What Protein Powder Should You Use?

When you walk into a health food store or a discount vitamin chain, are you overwhelmed by the rows of different protein powders? Picking the right protein powder can feel like a confusing game of science. Asking your doctor is always the best option when it comes to supplementing your diet, but allow me to clear up some of the confusion by explaining the good and bad of the various types of protein powders.The most popular types of protein used in protein powders are whey, rice, pea and soy. Protein powders can contain one of these or a mixture of two, such as rice and pea or soy and rice.

Whey: Whey protein is derived from milk and is the most commonly used protein supplement. It contains all nonessential and essential amino acids, as well as branch-chain amino acids (BCAA). Your muscles absorb whey easily and it is extremely safe to use. Whey protein might not be appropriate for those who have a milk allergy or who can’t tolerate lactose. There are two categories of whey protein powders: concentrate and isolate. The concentrate form is more widely used, easier to find and less expensive. It contains approximately 30 percent to 85 percent protein. Whey isolate is a higher-quality protein and is, therefore, more expensive. It contains more than 90 percent protein. Whey isolate is even more easily absorbed by the body and contains less fat and lactose.

Rice: Rice protein is derived by carefully isolating the protein from brown rice. It’s a complete protein containing all essential amino acids and nonessential amino acids. Rice protein is hypoallergenic, which makes it suitable for everyone.

Pea: Pea protein is a natural, vegetable-based protein powder derived from yellow peas, commonly known as “split peas.” Pea protein is a hypoallergenic protein that yields a high biological value (65.4 percent), which is an accurate indicator of the amount of protein absorbed. High-biological-value proteins are a better choice for increased nitrogen retention and enhanced immunity. With proper extraction and purification, pea protein can be concentrated from a normal level of 6 percent in fresh peas to 90-percent protein content. This process produces a protein powder that is highly soluble and easy to digest. Pea protein is ideal for vegans, offers an excellent nutritional profile, and is free of gluten, lactose, cholesterol and other anti-nutritional factors.

Soy: Soy protein is derived from soy flour. Similar to whey protein, soy protein comes in two types, the concentrate and the isolate, with the isolate being the more expensive form. Soy protein contains a natural chemical that mimics estrogen. Three cancer studies funded by the National Institutes of Health revealed estrogen-dependant tumor growth increased as the amount of soy isoflavones increased. A study published in 2000 by the American Association for Cancer Research compared soy to whey and concluded, “Whey appears to be at least twice as effective as soy in reducing both tumor incidence and multiplicity.” This news, coupled with concerns over soy protein negatively influencing thyroid function, has profound ramifications with respect to choosing a protein-powder supplement.

Animal or Vegetable Protein Foods

These are the two major protein sources. Animal-protein foods include meat, poultry, fish, dairy products and eggs. They are said to be of high biological value. Plant-protein sources, eaten together, enable a person to meet the standards of a high-biologic-protein diet.

If you choose to eat protein from dairy and/or meat, try to consume 12 ounces or less each week of fish, white-meat chicken or turkey. Eat beef as little as possible. If you desire dairy in your diet as a source of protein, use only fat-free dairy such as skim milk or nonfat yogurt, and limit it to 12 ounces per week.

Remember to always eat breakfast, even if you only have time to shake up a wholesome, low-fat, high-power protein and vegetable drink mix before racing off to work. Supplementing your diet with a high-quality protein powder made from whey-protein isolate or a combination of rice and pea protein can make a busy lifestyle a healthy one. When in doubt of the best protein-powder supplement to use, remember to always ask your doctor.

Donald L. Hayes, DC, graduated from Western States Chiropractic College in 1977 and is the author of five health and wellness books including his latest, Weight Loss to Wellness. To learn more, visit www.greensfirst.com.

June 3, 2016

Who wants to DECREASE body-fat and get in great shape?

In all honesty losing body-fat is easy but we tend to make it harder then it has to be. The #1 thing I see that trips people up is UNREALISTIC EXPECTATIONS.

You want it NOW and quit if you don’t lose 20 pounds in 4 weeks…4 weeks! you didn’t gain the weight in 4 weeks so ditch the expectation that you will lose it in 4 weeks.

Here are some very SIMPLE tips that will get you to where you want to be if you follow them.

1. Drink more water. Often times dehydration can mimic itself as hunger. Keep yourself adequately hydrated.

2. Ditch the black or white thinking. Those of you who struggle with ‘all or nothing’ thinking will find yourself starting only to quit, again and again. There is a middle here…find it! allow yourself to be human and make mistakes.

3. Eat more protein. Understand that protein is the building block of muscle and is necessary for repair and rebuilding. Protein also increases feelings of satiation, so you will feel fuller longer when you consume more protein. Some great sources are: chicken, lean beef, fish, turkey, ground meat, eggs, cottage cheese, Greek yogurt and protein powders.

4. Do NOT restrict/eliminate carbohydrates. Carbs are FUEL and are necessary in any healthy diet. The key is to eat according to your activity level that day. If you’re just lounging on the couch then you don’t need to be choking down tons of carbs, BUT if you’re active and training that day then you need to fuel your body. Some great sources are: brown rice, wild rice, sweet potatoes, whole wheat bread, wheat pasta, vegetables, fruit.

5. Fat is your friend. Yes, you heard that right. It is key in optimizing hormones for both men and women, improving metabolism and helping you feel satiated when paired with protein. Omega 3’s can also help to reduce inflammation in the body. Some great sources are: avocado, walnuts, almonds, olive oil, natural peanut butter, fish oil, krill oil.

6. Be more active. It’s pretty basic here folks. Get your butt up off the couch and go outside and frolic. We should get on average 10,000 steps per day but the average American gets only 2000-3000…no bueno.

7. Practice intuitive eating. I prefer to allow my body to tell me when to eat vs. just eating because it might be breakfast, lunch, or dinner time. We have been conditioned to eat at certain times even if we’re not hungry. Some people also believe that eating more meals per day boosts your metabolism. This simply isn’t true and the Thermic effect (TEF) is the same if you eat 3 meals at 1500 calories or 5 meals at 1500 calories. You must find what works for you.

8. R-E-L-A-X and allow the process to unfold. Stop weighing yourself every bloody day and just relax. Let the mirror and your clothes be your guide in determining body-fat reduction. Anything else and you’ll drive yourself mad, quit, and find yourself face first in a pint of Ben and Jerry’s.

9. Incorporate strength training into your exercise routine. The more muscle you have on your frame the more fat you will burn. It will also help you develop a killer physique, help negate osteoporosis and improve bone density. When you look good you feel good and this feeling of “wellness” will spill over to every area of your life.

10. Last, but most important, love yourself. Just know that you deserve to have a healthy, fully functioning body that will allow you to do those things you want to do. That may be traveling, getting pregnant, keeping up with your kids, no longer being embarrassed to wear a bathing suit, increasing intimacy with your spouse, etc.

May 21, 2016

Are your beliefs holding you back?

The biggest thing that I see when working with clients that causes them to not be as successful as they would like is their beliefs. This change we want to see occur most always will mean a change in routine, behavior and in some cases can be a major change in lifestyle.

(Matthew 17:20 He said to them, “Because of your little faith. For truly, I say to you, if you have faith like a grain of mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move, and nothing will be impossible for you.”)

It is not what type of diet they are adhering to or what type of workout program they are following. For most, but not all, it comes down to what they are ‘telling’ themselves.

Do you recognize any of these limiting beliefs?

-I’m too old to start.
-I have a family to look after and don’t have the time.
-I am older now and this is just what happens as we age.
-I’m never able to stick to anything…I’m a failure!
-What is the point in trying as I will only fail again.
-I’m not going to be able to do this, who am I kidding?

Look back and you will see that you have lost weight more times than you can count but did it stay off? Were you able to maintain that desired weight? Why or why not?

For the record I don’t personally think we should aim for a certain number on the scale but try to be the healthiest we can be at whatever weight that might be.

Go back to the last time you tried to drop the weight…were your thoughts powerful and full of optimism or were they of impending doom and gloom? Did you believe that you would get it right this time or in the back of your mind did you tell yourself that this time wouldn’t be any different than before?

(Matthew 8:26 And he said to them,” Why are you afraid, O you of little faith?” Then he rose and rebuked the winds and the sea, and there was a great calm.)

There are many reasons why we hold onto our weight. You may have come from an abusive background and the weight now serves as your ‘protection’ from further harm. The weight may have helped you to remain ‘hidden’ from the world and it probably did help you at one point in your life cope, but now this way of coping is causing you more harm than good.

The weight may be a way of punishing yourself or keeping you from having to try something new. It gives you an excuse to remain stuck where you are at. Think about it, how different would your life be if you were no longer defined by your weight? That can be pretty scary, I get it, but it’s time to let it go.

We must believe that we will be successful and then begin to cultivate healthy habits that will stick. Start small and build up your confidence and from there you can begin to tackle larger goals. Find what works for you and do more of that. Give yourself permission to fail as it is through our failures that we are able to learn what works and what doesn’t.

Understand that this is a process that takes time. That is why I don’t advocate any type of ‘quick-fix’ diet. It isn’t about the food! The beliefs that drive your thoughts, habits and behaviors took years to develop and won’t be undone overnight. Remind yourself of that when you end up binging or find yourself eating when you’re stressed, lonely or bored. It’s all a part of the process of change.

(Romans 12:12 Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.)

May 6, 2016

Being Overweight or Obese Sucks

Being overweight or clinically obese SUCKS.

I don’t care what anyone else says or tries to convince themselves of.

It is unhealthy, it is mentally and physically exhausting, it erodes your self-esteem, and can rob you of a decent life.

I know firsthand because for YEARS I was obese.

I tried to convince myself that it wasn’t “that bad.”

I get a message from a gentlemen the other day who told me, “Brandon, not everyone who is overweight has some sort of psychological issue. You know that right?”

To which I responded, “duh.”

I’m well aware that not everyone has some sort of underlying issue surrounding their weight issues.

But, everyone I’ve ever worked with has had some sort of underlying issue we’ve had to address before they could successfully lose the weight and keep it off.

Mind, Body, Spirit.

You can’t address only one aspect of yourself and expect any type of major, long lasting change.

Here are just some of the things that I personally deal with to this day. I have no problem being transparent and sharing my struggles in this area.

-I’ve got to exercise often and watch my diet or I will balloon back up to Nutty Professor status.
-Losing weight and keeping it off takes WORK.
-There are days I look in the mirror and feel like dog crap; I can see that fat guy staring back at me.
-Those old tapes can start playing and if I’m not careful I’ll believe the lies they try to tell me about myself….I’m no good, not worthy, etc.

Now, these things I mentioned above are not as bad as they once were but they still creep up from time to time. I’ve had to work my ass off to overcome a lot, as have the clients I work with.

The majority of people I work with are survivors of some sort of trauma. It could have been sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical abuse, parents were drug addicts, codependents, neglectful, etc.

Often times we used food as kids to numb ourselves and this carried over into adulthood.

Maybe you had no issues like this but you find yourself struggling today with food or some other ‘thing’ that you’re using to avoid your feelings.

No matter what it is there IS healing from it. I know because I did the work and my life is completely different because of it. That doesn’t mean I don’t struggle because there are days that life kicks my butt, but I am no longer a slave to those things.

If you are struggling with your weight or some other thing that is keeping you in bondage I want you to know that I GET IT.

I know the shame you feel.

The guilt.

The feeling of being invisible.

The feeling of hopelessness.

The feeling of being unworthy.

You name the emotion, I have felt it right along with you.

Your situation isn’t hopeless, you’re not a failure, and you are not unworthy.

God didn’t put you here to just survive.

If that was the case He would have made you a tree stump.

You have a purpose in this life.

I want to help you uncover that purpose.

If my words can help just one person then it is all worth it.

If you need help with this I am available to assist you.

Your life will change the day you begin to do the hard work.

Yes, it is scary.

Yes, it will require hard work on your part.

But it is worth it and so are YOU.

If you’re ready to change your life, and live in Idaho or beyond, I can help.

April 4, 2016

Nutrition made easy with these Mexican Chicken Wraps

Mexican Chicken Wraps

Serving Size: 1 chicken wrap

Ingredients

Chicken:

2 tablespoons vegetable Oil
2 skinless chicken breasts
2 tablespoons taco seasoning

Other ingredients:

6 cups spinach, shredded, or 1 head green leaf lettuce, shredded or torn into bite-size pieces
3 medium tomatoes, diced
4 green onions, chopped
1/4 cup red onion, chopped
1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
1/2 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese
flour tortilla wraps (or gluten-free tortillas or sandwich wraps)

Dressing (option 1): Ranch salad dressing

Healthier Dressing (option 2): Greek yogurt mixed with the taco seasoning and chopped cilantro

Credits: www.juliasalbum.com 

March 3, 2016

What types of protein should you use, how much, and what types

What is the difference between the difference protein powders out there? (e.g. whey, casein, vegetarian)

Answer: The key difference between whey and casein is that whey is absorbed in the digestive system quickly, whereas casein is absorbed slowly and steadily. Egg white protein was the most popular type of protein supplement for many years before milk proteins surpassed its popularity due to their better taste and lower cost. Soy and hemp are unique among vegetable protein sources in that they supply all 8 essential amino acids. Most vegetable proteins lack one or more. There also is pea protein and brown rice protein. These are for vegetarians and those who don’t do well with dairy products.

When should you use what kind?

Answer: I would use the whey upon waking and after training if you are unable to eat a solid meal. If you’re looking for a MRP [meal replacement powder] then I would use the casein as it digest slower than the whey and will stick with you longer, promoting satiety. The hemp protein would also be a consideration to be used as an MRP in a smoothie.

What kind of protein powders do you suggest and why?

Answer: I suggest whey, casein and hemp protein powders. Casein, is known for slow digestion, so it is very beneficial in shakes that are used as meal replacements or a bedtime shake. The whey is excellent before and after training as it is absorbed into the bloodstream, and utilized by the body the fastest. Hemp protein is not only is an excellent protein source but also supplies healthy fats and is high in fiber. Hemp protein also contains large amounts of zinc, iron, and magnesium and EFA (omega 3, 6, 9)

I prefer to use whey protein upon waking and after training because the body can digest and use it rapidly. I will at times you casein at night because it digests slower providing my muscles with a steady stream of amino acids.

What ingredients should people avoid?

Answer: The main thing to look for in a clean protein is lack of artificial sweeteners and information on the label stating that the protein is derived from cattle that has not been exposed to synthetic hormones, chemicals or medications. How much should a person take and how much is too much? (if exercise or meal replacement)

For people that are dairy sensitive or vegetarian what can they do?

Answer: You need at least 0.8 grams per pound and as much as 1.5 grams if you are engaging in intense exercise for more than 1 hour per day and 6-7 days per week. A 140lb woman could easily need 112 grams per day. For vegetarians Brown rice protein powder has many benefits for health and fitness. It provides a convenient source of protein for vegetarians and others who follow restricted diets. Pea protein is also something to consider if you’re a vegetarian or sensitive to dairy. Yellow peas supply an alternative but complete source of amino acids and high in iron.

The quality of proteins can be measured in two ways. The most common measure is the Biological Value (BV).  The BV of certain proteins is calculated by measuring the percentage of protein consumed and absorbed versus how much of it is excreted as waste. This gives an indication of how much of the protein that is consumed actually remains within the body to promote protein synthesis Protein synthesis means how much protein the body will actually use.

I hope this clears up any misconceptions you might have had about using protein supplements, which ones, when, and how much!

May 2, 2015

How to lose weight with PCOS

The Facts:

Insulin resistance is the main reason why it’s more challenging for you to lose weight with PCOS and generally.

About 80% of the women with PCOS have insulin resistance but then again if you’re overweight…

Chances are you already have an insulin resistance but without me going into a long complicated explanation of what insulin resistance is…

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April 10, 2015

Are you getting enough FAT in your diet?

Despite being vilified for many years, dietary fats are one of the 3 main nutrients that your body needs to function properly. Their numerous health benefits include controlling blood levels of cholesterol and glucose, preventing the development of cancer, reducing your heart disease risk and supporting your vital organs (including your brain, your heart, your liver and your lungs). However, due to the popularity of low fat diets and the untrue assertion that dietary fat is automatically stored as body fat, many people choose to eliminate this macronutrient from their diet. Doing this can be extremely damaging to your health and in this article I will be discussing why with 14 of the negative symptoms of dietary fat deficiency.

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February 12, 2015

How to help end emotional eating

Do you find yourself constantly struggling with overeating? This may be why.

Dopamine is a hormone that is involved with appetite regulation and the reward system in the brain.

Did you ever wonder why you couldn’t stop at just one cookie or slice of cake? or why you eat even when you’re not legitimately hungry?

A lot of people get caught up in overeating because of the momentary pleasure it produces…and then the guilt and shame follow.

Here are 6 tips that can help you balance your dopamine.

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